Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word

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This was sent to me in and email from another on air personality from another station.  These are some powerful words!

“Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word.”  Not only was it an Elton John song title from the 1970’s… it’s a reality for the present.

We live in a world struggling to share a simple, sincere “I’m sorry.”

An admission of mistakes or wrongdoing seems rare. My attorney friends openly acknowledge our legal system doesn’t exactly encourage honesty. Career politicians rarely confess errors when they know a sound bite of any confession could be used against them in the next election cycle. Companies don’t often say “oops, we’re sorry” for a product or service gone wrong because of the potential litigation.

Let’s be honest with ourselves. We all make mistakes. We all make bad decisions. We all commit sin. There may be reasons and circumstances both “in and out” of our control. But how often do we accept and confess our own responsibility?

Hopefully in this life we learn from those mishaps and avoid repetition. Change can often be a long struggle. But we can’t move in a new direction if we don’t admit our role in the problem.

When mistakes happen, what would you rather hear: Excuses and blame always pointed elsewhere? Or, acceptance of responsibility, empathy for the damage done, and a commitment for change? Which response would create more respect for that person in your eyes? Which employee would you extend more trust?

Sometimes it takes some courage to do the right thing and set your pride aside. You will sense something change inside when you ask forgiveness. The word Humility comes to mind. “Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves.”  – Philippians 2:3

Even though you and I are not responsible for every problem we encounter, offering care and sincere empathy for those impacted by a mistake or wrongdoing is something we can all grow in.

Take courage, my friends. May our children see a sincere apology will yield much in one’s own life.

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